Design Inspo: Canva & Stencil

Hey y’all! One of my favorite things to do when I have some free time is mess around with making fun graphics. I wanted to share with you guys a couple of websites that I use.

Canva is free and super simple to use. I have created Pinterest graphics, blog headers, and collages with it. I love messing around with it. There’s lots of options. However, many pictures you may want to use do cost $1, but for the most part you can get very creative without spending any money.

These are a couple of the things I have created with canva so far.

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Side note: If you haven’t watched 24 (hence the Jack Bauer quotes) you should definitely check it out!!! 🙂


Stencil* is another website, similar to Canva, but with more graphics and definitely geared towards social media. So if that’s your interest, I’d definitely go with Stencil. You can get a free account and create 10 images per month or you can pay monthly and have access to hundreds of thousands of free images and storage and lots of cool features. It’s very easy to use and more intuitive than Canva.

A graphic for my blog that I made.

So…with that being said, have you guys ever tried these websites? Let me know! I’d also love to see any of your creations, so feel free to share. ❤

 

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Modernism

Modernism was a movement that occurred in the late nineteenth century and continued into the twentieth century. It contrasted with the movement of neoclassicism from the eighteenth century. The latter strongly emphasized order, reason, the following of convention and optimism about human nature. Modernism did the opposite.

Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) wrote several works in which he expressed very modernistic ideas: chaos, disorder, the passions, irrationality and aggressiveness.

Another theme found in modernism, particularly in Friedrich Nietzsche’s works, was a dismissal of the Christian code of morality. Nietzsche believed that people should make their own morality code to follow.

The modernistic disorder can also be found in science. Isaac Newton in the eighteenth century had said that the universe followed orderly laws. In 1913, Niels Bohr found that the electrons did not abide by Newton’s laws of motion. Therefore, he and many other scientists of that era concluded that the universe was not orderly. Continue reading

Three High Renaissance Artists

Leonardo da Vinci (1452 – 1519) was the epitome of a Renaissance man, being skilled in at least ten occupations. Among these were architecture, sculpture, painting, science, engineering, botany and inventing. Ten works have survived that we can surely attribute to Leonardo. Three of these are the ‘Last Supper’, the ‘Virgin of the Rocks’ and the  ‘Mona Lisa.’ Continue reading