Shakespeare vs. KJV Bible

Which is easier to read, Shakespeare or the King James Version of the Bible?

I’d say that the Bible is easier to read. Shakespeare is great. I really do like reading his works, but the language is extremely hard to understand. For example,

“…Out of this silence yet I picked a welcome;

 And in the modesty of fearful duty

 I read as much as from a rattling tongue

 Of saucy and audacious eloquence.

 Love, therefore, and tongue-tied simplicity

 In least speak most, to my capacity.”

          A Midsummer Night’s Dream­—Act V, Scene I

                                or Continue reading

Sanctions In the Bible

“How important is the idea of covenant sanctions in the week’s readings? (Readings from the King James version of the Bible.)”

What are sanctions? The idea of sanctions is that if you do something wrong you will have to pay for it. For example, if you rob someone, now negative sanctions will come upon you. Sanctions can also be positive. If you help or serve someone, you may feel happy. That would be positive sanctions.

A covenant is an agreement between two parties to do something. In terms of the Bible, the covenant was between God and the people of Israel.

Covenantal sanctions are extremely important in the Bible, if not the central part of it. For example, God through Moses gave the people the Ten Commandments to live by. If they disobeyed these guidelines, God would bring negative sanctions upon them. Continue reading

Abraham to Moses

Abraham

Abraham Traveling to Canaan

“Now the LORD said unto Abram: ‘Get thee out of thy country, and from the kindred, and from thy father’s house, unto the land that I will show thee. And I will make of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and make thy name great; and be thou a blessing.” (Genesis 12: 1-2) And so, Abram son of Terah, a descendant of Noah, left Ur, Chaldea with his wife Sarai and his nephew Lot for the land of Canaan. Continue reading