Bacon’s “Essays”

“Would any of Bacon’s essays have been more persuasive if he had talked about his own experiences?”

Essays was written by Francis Bacon in 1597, England. The work consists of several relatively short essays on various topics such as “Of Counsel” or “Of Friendship.” Bacon wrote the essays to influence people, change thought and behavior and to give advice. For example, in “Of Friendship”, he talks of how true friends are the only thing that can open the heart. Perhaps he wanted people to look more towards having true friends instead of worthless “friendships” that didn’t add anything to their lives. He wanted to give counsel as to what to look for in friends.

However, though Bacon’s topics are excellent and he gives good advice, etc…, there is something missing: personal experience. If Bacon had provided personal experience, like, for example, in the essay “Of Friendship”, you would have been more moved to change or at least think about his advice. Personal experience also gives us a better tie Continue reading

The Scientific Revolution

The Scientific Revolution occurred in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, although like everything else, it had origins much earlier and lingered for a long time after. It is called a revolution not because people were scientifically stupid and then became scholars, but because it brought about a great step forward in science.

Francis Bacon:

One key individual in bringing forth the Scientific Revolution was Francis Bacon (1561 – 1626). He began dissuading people from blindly believing ancient scholars such as Aristotle and Galen, without personal experimentation.

Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon

Bacon wrote a book called Novum Organum, which contradicted Aristotle’s work Organon. The Organon was a collection of six works on logic by Aristotle. In his book, Bacon brought forth a new logic—inductive reasoning. Aristotle had taught deductive reasoning. Here is an example of inductive and deductive reasoning:

  • Inductive: 100% of biological life forms that we know depend on liquid water to exist. Therefore, if we discover a new biological life form, it will probably depend on liquid water to exist.
  • Deductive: All men are mortal. Socrates is a man. Therefore, Socrates is mortal.

Heliocentrism:

One of the most famous scientific advances that occurred during the Scientific Revolution involved heliocentrism. As taught by figures such as Aristotle and Ptolemy, the earth was fixed and motionless. Surrounding it were perfectly spherical planets orbiting the earth in concentric, circular orbits at a constant speed. This was called geocentrism.

Nicolaus Copernicus (1473 – 1543) wrote a work called On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres. This book, dedicated to the pope, focused on the topic of heliocentrism: a system in which the sun was at the center.   Continue reading