The Canon in D | 1690-present

One of the most influential musical works of all time. Obscure till the 20th century. Why is it special? Who revived it? What is it’s significance today? Step back in time and experience 1690-present through the eyes of Pachelbel’s Canon in D. 


Hello readers! I hope you’re having a wonderful day so far! Last time I asked you guys what you wanted to see next and the majority was for baroque music. So here it is! I hope you guys enjoy. Please like and share if you do enjoy it and subscribe if you want to see more posts like this! ❤

But before we get into it…a little musical meme… 😉 Continue reading

The Factors Leading Up To World War II

During World War I, Japan had been an ally of Britain, France, Italy, Russia and the U.S. After WWI, America decided to gain territories in the Pacific, and it formed the Pacific Defense Triangle. Japan also wanted to expand and it began a rivalry with the U.S. over the Pacific.

At the same time, Japan began expanding into Asia, particularly into China—a now weak country due to their revolutions and civil wars. In 1931 the Mukden Incident occurred and started sporadic warfare between Japan and China, which lasted until 1937. That same year (1937) the Marco Polo bridge incident came about. This officially started World War II in the East. From then until 1945 there was continuous warfare between China and Japan.

Adolph Hitler and his Nazis were another key factor in bringing forth World War II. Hitler was born in Austria-Hungary. His parents both died while he was still young. He made his living off of an inheritance and also painting post cards. Throughout his adolescence Hitler was involved in anti-Semitic movements. This is key because when he came into power Hitler was set upon practically wiping out the Jewish population in Germany and elsewhere. Hitler also fought in WWI and became a corporal.

After the war he was assigned to infiltrate a group called the DAP. Continue reading

Karl Marx and Marxism

Karl Marx (1818-1883) was born into a wealthy German family, the third of nine children. His father was a classical liberal, a philosophy from which Karl would eventually stray. Marx was a philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and the founder of Marxism.

Karl studied privately under his father until he was twelve years old, at which time he attended the local high school. When he was seventeen years old he went to the University of Bonn. Marx wanted to study philosophy and literature. However his father, a lawyer, desired that his son follow in his footsteps. Soon after, Marx transferred to the Berlin University because of bad grades. He then studied law, and philosophy on the side. In 1841 he got his P.H.D.

In 1843, Karl married Jenny von Westphalen, whom he had been engaged to for seven years. They had their first child, a daughter, in 1844. Together they would have seven children, only three of whom would survive to adulthood.Karl Marx

After graduating from college, Marx began to embrace communist ideas. He met Friedrich Engels, a fellow communist, in 1844. They became life-long friends and were the founders of Marxism. In 1848, the two wrote their most important work, The Communist Manifesto.

Karl Marx died in 1883, soon after his wife’s death.

As previously mentioned, Marxism was founded by Marx and Friedrich Engels. Marx believed that Communism would inevitably come forth, without any help. According to Marx, this would occur when the lower class overthrew the upper class capitalists.

Marx also believed that the state was the result of the exploitation of one class of another (the upper class of the working class). Therefore, when the lower class revolted the state would wither away.

Why did Marx think that Communism was superior to Capitalism? Marx said that the division of labor would be abolished, therefore human opportunity, apparently previously stifled, would now flourish. In other words, there would be more autonomy.

He also said that there would be more productivity because society would be planned.

However, in reality, after observing Marxism put to use throughout history, autonomy did not increase, and neither did productivity. Marx’s communist system brought forth dictatorships and unhappiness to the countries wherein it was employed.

The War of the Spanish Succession

The War of the Spanish Succession (1701 – 1714) began because the Spanish emperor, Charles II, had no heir to the throne. When Charles died, Louis XIV of France suggested that his own grandson, Philip of Anjou (later Philip V), should be the next Spanish king. He reinforced his argument by stating that Charles had accepted this proposal in his will. On the other hand, Leopold I of the Holy Roman Empire brought forth his own candidate for the Spanish throne. The two sides (Holy Roman Empire and France) then became rivals, both wanting an alliance with Spain.

Another factor leading to this war was a general concern that if France joined with Spain, it would become too powerful—both economically and militarily. Lastly, in order to avoid this war, there was a proposal to break up the Spanish lands: the Netherlands, Italian lands, and Spain. England and Louis XIV agreed to this, but  Continue reading

The Levellers

The Levellers were a group of political thinkers in the seventeenth century, during the English Civil War. They are often considered the first influential Western libertarian movement.

The root of the Levellers’ philosophy came, for the most part, from the idea of self-ownership. In other words: you own yourself. They also believed in the right to do what you want with your own property. “You can do what you want, as long as it doesn’t violate another’s individual rights.” Continue reading