My Top 10: Books, Movies & Music

My top 10 favorite BOOKS…actually more like 9:

  • The Three Musketeers by Alexander Dumas
  • All Zane Grey novels, mainly Light of Western Stars
  • Tom Clancy Op-Center novels
  • Clancy novels on Jack Ryan
  • The Lord of the Rings & Hobbit by JRR Tolkien
  • How to Make Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie (non-fiction)
  • Foundation Novels by Isaac Asimov
  • Nothing by Chance by Richard Bach
  • The Art of the Deal by Donald Trump
  • I read a ton of books, but these are my very favorites!!! 🙂

 

My top 10 favorite MOVIES…actually more like 14: Continue reading

The Canon in D | 1690-present

One of the most influential musical works of all time. Obscure till the 20th century. Why is it special? Who revived it? What is it’s significance today? Step back in time and experience 1690-present through the eyes of Pachelbel’s Canon in D. 


Hello readers! I hope you’re having a wonderful day so far! Last time I asked you guys what you wanted to see next and the majority was for baroque music. So here it is! I hope you guys enjoy. Please like and share if you do enjoy it and subscribe if you want to see more posts like this! ❤

But before we get into it…a little musical meme… 😉 Continue reading

My Top 10 Favorite Songs

This is kind of random, but I thought it would be fun to share with you what I like to listen to and what are my current favorite songs (they aren’t in any particular order). Feel free to let me know your favorite songs!

  1. Rhinestone Cowboy, sung by Glen Campbell (and really all his songs)
  2. Vincent, sung by Don Mclean
  3. Home Again, sung by Ashley Campbell
  4. Scherza Infida, sung by Philippe Jaroussky
  5. Jesus and Me, sung by Glen Campbell
  6. Sky Bird/Lonely Looking Sky, sung by Neil Diamond (from the film Jonathan Livingston Seagull)
  7. A Thing Called Love, sung by Jerry Reed
  8. Any Old Road Will Take You There, sung by Balsam Range
  9. On the Road Again, sung by Willie Nelson
  10. Into the West, sung by Annie Lenox (from the film the Lord of the Rings)

Modernism

Modernism was a movement that occurred in the late nineteenth century and continued into the twentieth century. It contrasted with the movement of neoclassicism from the eighteenth century. The latter strongly emphasized order, reason, the following of convention and optimism about human nature. Modernism did the opposite.

Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) wrote several works in which he expressed very modernistic ideas: chaos, disorder, the passions, irrationality and aggressiveness.

Another theme found in modernism, particularly in Friedrich Nietzsche’s works, was a dismissal of the Christian code of morality. Nietzsche believed that people should make their own morality code to follow.

The modernistic disorder can also be found in science. Isaac Newton in the eighteenth century had said that the universe followed orderly laws. In 1913, Niels Bohr found that the electrons did not abide by Newton’s laws of motion. Therefore, he and many other scientists of that era concluded that the universe was not orderly. Continue reading

Romanticism

Romanticism was a cultural movement in the 19th century, which changed art, music and literature. It came after neo-classicism, which had sought to organize and rationalize the over extravagant baroque era.

There are several themes in romanticism. There was an intense interest in the distant past, particularly the Middle Ages. Also, nationalism and a more patriotic outlook on life, along with a break with artistic convention, brought forth more individual expression.

Ludwig Van Beethoven

Ludwig Van Beethoven

There are many beautiful works of music from the Romantic era. Innovation played a strong part in making the music so unique. For example, composing five movements for a symphony rather than four, and composing choral symphonies. Individualism was also central. Ludwig van Beethoven brought forth program music. Verdi, Beethoven, Liszt, Chopin and Schumann were a few romantic composers. Continue reading